Good news for traditional ICE supercar fans, Ferrari and Lamborghini execs have said that neither brand is planning a pure EV any time soon. Hybrids, on the other hand, are on the way.

Maurizio Reggiani, Lamborghini research and development director, told CarAdvice at the Frankfurt show that EV tech isn't there yet for supercars. "If I look in the next outlook of a super sports car...full-electric (technology isn’t) suitable for a super sports car," he said.

Ferrari's CTO, Michael Leiters, told Automotive News Europe much the same. He said that "there is a need for more time, more innovation to get the same performance."

More importantly for those who enjoy the sounds of exotic internal combustion engines, both brands are aware that the sound and feel are a huge part of what exotic car buyers want. Leiters said "what’s even more challenging, to get the same driving pleasure that we have today. Just think of the sound and things like that which are essential for us." Reggiani echoed the sentiment, saying "people will still buy this car because of the characteristics such as sound and the DNA emotion that we cannot delete from the brand."

Even if full EV's aren't on the horizon for the Italian supercar, hybrid power, likely plug-in hybrid power, is. Lamborghini is part of the Volkswagen group, which is moving full-tilt toward electrification. And for a car like the successor to the Aventador, hybrid power can be a way to boost performance while still achieving modern emissions targets.

Reggiani said that "in terms of maximum speed, packaging, weight of the battery and for this reason we are looking for, the next generation of super sport vehicle will be focussed on PHEV technology." Lamborghini CEO Stefano Domenicali confirmed this, saying "hybridization for sure will come, in the next five years for sure."

Leiter gave a similar statement from Ferrari, saying that "for us the first step is hybridization." The brand has already made its first move to hybridization with the 950 hp mild hybrid LaFerrari.

Other automakers at the leading edge of performance are making similar moves toward at least some electrification. Aston Martin said last month that all of its cars will offer some hybrid tech by the mid 2020s. Supercar maker McLaren said half of its lineup will have hybrid options by 2022.